Shape Shifting [2015-16]
in collaboration with Elke Marhoefer

16mm film transferred to digital, color/sound, 18 min. 26 sek., Japan/France/Germany.

And a publication:

Text (PDF) published in English and French for the exhibition 100 Years Later at Palais De Tokyo, Paris.

In order to challenge the understanding of nature situated apart from human, the film Shape Shifting suggest another arrangement where human and nonhuman join relations and productively interact. It outlines a cartography of a specific landscape, which exhibits a high natural diversity and is called satoyama in Japanese. Located on the border zone between mountain and arable land, the landscape is formed by a land-use based on observation and experimentation with nature and is accomplished over a relatively long time span by the methods of observing (mi) and trying (tameshi). The method of observation and try out was first articulated in the tim e of the Edo period and unified in the phrase mitameshi. Marked by the mutual effects of nonhuman and human life forms, satoyama can be regarded as a manifold of assemblages of transformations, appearing on the plane of a landscape.

Present research on satoyama claims that the variety of species in the area is so high, not because the land is untouched and undisturbed by anthropogenic impacts, but rather because of a limited and elaborated land-use. Integrated activities caused by human and other natural circumstances are enhancing, and not diminishing of nature’s diversity. During the making of Shape Shifting we encountered different fire related routines and learned about a fire farming pra ctice called kishiaki in Japanese. Through kishiaki the farmers regularly use fire to change the co mposition of plant varieties in a certain area. The dogma of ecology as a state of equilibrium has long suppres sed natural fires and human burning or pruning practices with the argument of damaging nature’s “natural state,” but in fact these disturbances enhance and revive diversity. Whereas the suppression of fire, hinders for example the germination of lower plants and various sleeping seeds and eliminates animals that depend on these plants.

the film was made with help and support of: Hiroyuki Yoshioka, Katsue Fukamachi, Ayumi Ogino, Tomoyo Adachi, Sninichi Mori, Satoshi Asakura, Kent Hadlock, Naoki Shiomi, Kazuma Higashida, Mamoru Daido, Shinichi Aoki, Susumu Nakanishi, Horie Ryohei.
Additional support was provided by Pavillon Neuflize OBC, Palais De Tokyo.

film by: Mikhail Lylov and Elke Marhoefer
sound mixing: Marian Mentrup
production: Ding Dong Production

Shape Shifting [2015-16]
in collaboration with Elke Marhoefer

16mm film transferred to digital, color/sound, 18 min. 26 sek., Japan/France/Germany.

And a publication:

Text (PDF) published in English and French for the exhibition 100 Years Later at Palais De Tokyo, Paris.

In order to challenge the understanding of nature situated apart from human, the film Shape Shifting suggest another arrangement where human and nonhuman join relations and productively interact. It outlines a cartography of a specific landscape, which exhibits a high natural diversity and is called satoyama in Japanese. Located on the border zone between mountain and arable land, the landscape is formed by a land-use based on observation and experimentation with nature and is accomplished over a relatively long time span by the methods of observing (mi) and trying (tameshi). The method of observation and try out was first articulated in the tim e of the Edo period and unified in the phrase mitameshi. Marked by the mutual effects of nonhuman and human life forms, satoyama can be regarded as a manifold of assemblages of transformations, appearing on the plane of a landscape.

Present research on satoyama claims that the variety of species in the area is so high, not because the land is untouched and undisturbed by anthropogenic impacts, but rather because of a limited and elaborated land-use. Integrated activities caused by human and other natural circumstances are enhancing, and not diminishing of nature’s diversity. During the making of Shape Shifting we encountered different fire related routines and learned about a fire farming pra ctice called kishiaki in Japanese. Through kishiaki the farmers regularly use fire to change the co mposition of plant varieties in a certain area. The dogma of ecology as a state of equilibrium has long suppres sed natural fires and human burning or pruning practices with the argument of damaging nature’s “natural state,” but in fact these disturbances enhance and revive diversity. Whereas the suppression of fire, hinders for example the germination of lower plants and various sleeping seeds and eliminates animals that depend on these plants.

the film was made with help and support of: Hiroyuki Yoshioka, Katsue Fukamachi, Ayumi Ogino, Tomoyo Adachi, Sninichi Mori, Satoshi Asakura, Kent Hadlock, Naoki Shiomi, Kazuma Higashida, Mamoru Daido, Shinichi Aoki, Susumu Nakanishi, Horie Ryohei.
Additional support was provided by Pavillon Neuflize OBC, Palais De Tokyo.

film by: Mikhail Lylov and Elke Marhoefer
sound mixing: Marian Mentrup
production: Ding Dong Production